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February 5, 2018

Recommended Reading: A Driller and a Geologist Walk into a Bar...

Drilling requires not only making sure you have the right equipment for the job, but the ability to build networks and relationships with the right people. The human dynamic can be as varied and as challenging as the terrain and climates we work in.  This means mutual respect, understanding and communication are key to making sure the drill project is handled correctly and completed in an efficient manner.

A recent article published in Coring Magazine tackled the often misunderstood perspectives of both geologists and drillers and how pairing and comparing the experience and skillsets from these two occupations can have a beneficial impact on project success.

Written by Erik Ronald, PG of Mining Geology HQ, the article, “A Driller and a Geologist Walk into a Bar…,” pulls the reader into the intriguing world of exploration and mining by candidly hitting on the stereotypes of both drillers and geologists.

“From a geologist’s perspective, drillers are often viewed as a necessary evil... From a driller’s perspective, geologists are often viewed as a necessary evil.” Mr. Ronald continues on, tongue in cheek, to identify how these professions often perceive each other which most often creates roadblocks and can be counter-productive to the smooth operations of drilling projects.

“From a geologist’s perspective, drillers are often viewed as a necessary evil... From a driller’s perspective, geologists are often viewed as a necessary evil.”

Although the first few paragraphs may sound like the author is putting these two professions at odds, he is quick to add that, “At the end of the day, it’s best to laugh off the stereotypes and realize we’re both important pieces of the same puzzle and equally critical for success… The best geologists are the ones who ask a lot of questions about drilling and the best drillers are the ones who are curious about geology.”

Drillers and geologists may not understand each other’s terminology, they may not agree with each other’s philosophies or like how each dress, but accepting the differences and communicating for greater understanding always brings better results. As Mr. Ronald points out, “I encourage every driller and geologist out there to spend a few minutes explaining what they’re doing, why they’re doing it, and find some common ground.  If a driller and a geologist walk into a bar with a willingness to teach and listen to each other, they’ll both soon realize the benefits of working together for project success.”

"The best geologists are the ones who ask a lot of questions about drilling and the best drillers are the ones who are curious about geology."

We recommend reading the full article, “A Driller and a Geologist Walk into a Bar…,” written by Erik Ronald, PG, of Mining Geology HQ. It can be found published by Coring Magazine and on the author’s website.

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